Adolescent Health Program

Meet the LEAH Fellows

LEAH Fellows 2014

LEAH Fellows 2014-(from left to right) Jack Rusley, Uche Onyewuchi, Deanna Wilson, Shanelle Geddis, Priya Gupta, Leslie Redmond, Ashley Millard (not shown, Damali Wilson, Kathryn Van Eck)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fellow Information:

 

NamePositionEmail
Lanisa BrownLEAH Social Work Fellowlanisabrown@gmail.com
Camille Robinson, MD MPHLEAH Medicine Fellowcrobin70@jhmi.edu
Uche Onyewuchi, DO MHSLEAH Medicine Fellowuonyewu1@jhmi.edu
Jocelyn Ronda, MDLEAH Medicine Fellowjronda1@jhmi.edu
Jack Rusley, MD MHSLEAH Medicine Fellowjrusley1@jhu.edu
Jessica Tillman, RNLEAH Nursing Fellowjtillma5@jhmiledu
Damali Wilson, RNLEAH Nursing Fellowdrahman1@jhmi.edu
Deanna Wilson, MD MPHLEAH Medicine Fellowdeanna.wilson@jhmi.edu
Kathryn Van Eck, PhDLEAH Psychology Fellowkvaneck1@jhu.edu
Leslie Redmond, MS RDLEAH Nutrition Fellowlredmon4@jhmi.edu

 


Fellow Biographies:

Jack Rusley, MD MHS

Dr. Rusley is a pediatrician and internist, and now a first year fellow in the adolescent medicine program at Johns Hopkins. He was born and raised in Denver, Colorado, and was admitted to the Program in Liberal Medical Education (an eight-year combined bachelors-MD program) at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, where graduated with a bachelor of arts in education history and policy in 2003.  After an intense and rewarding two years teaching math and science at Murdoch Middle School, a project-based charter school in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, he returned to Brown for medical school.  There, he co-led the Physicians for Human Rights chapter, created the Pharmaceutical Policy Task Force that helped changed the school’s conflict of interest policy, served as the National Chair of the American Medical Association’s Culture of Medicine Action Committee, and was elected to the Gold Humanism Honor Society.  He spent one year at Yale University School of Medicine as a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellow, where he created a national survey of pediatric HIV providers on the transition of youth living with HIV to adult care. He competed his internship and residency in combined Internal Medicine and Pediatrics (Med-Peds) at Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine.   During residency, he founded the Maine Adolescent Council on Transition  (ACT Maine), a support and leadership training group for youth with chronic illness. His research interests include positive youth development, youth with chronic illness, health care transitions of youth to adult care, and resilience.  He is board eligible in pediatrics and internal medicine.

Leslie Redmond, MS, RD

Leslie Redmond is a nutrition PhD student at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and is the nutrition fellow for the JHU LEAH program. Leslie completed her undergraduate degree in Food Science at Clemson University, after which she spent nine months in Alaska completing her dietetic internship. Her experience in Alaska lead to her current research interest in the prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes in American Indian and Alaska Native populations, with an emphasis on adolescents. After earning her registered dietitian credentials, Leslie earned a master’s degree in exercise science at James Madison University, where she continued to work in health promotion for adolescents while working as a camp counselor at a weight loss camp for teens and volunteering on research projects at the Morrison Bruce Center for the Promotion of Physical Activity for Girls and Women. At Johns Hopkins, Leslie’s thesis research involves the evaluation of multi-level, multi-institutional obesity prevention programs in American Indian communities. She is a Johnson & Johnson Scholar, assisting in monitoring and evaluation capacity building for a community health organization focusing on obesity prevention in children, and also works at the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center as needed as a nutritionist and exercise physiologist, and as the Project Coordinator for the Healthy Monday’s text message based obesity prevention trial.

Damali Wilson, MSN, CPNP-PC

Damali Wilson is a PhD student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She completed her undergraduate studies at Hampton University as a nursing major and went on to purse a Master of Science in Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. In addition to being a doctoral student, Ms. Rahman is also a certified pediatric nurse practitioner. Her research interest in adolescent health and disparities is reflected in her previous work as a health facilitator for an intervention study for adolescent ethnic minority parents, research assistance for HIV and HPV vaccination studies among underserved populations, and involvement in several projects and initiatives for teens with sickle cell disease. The focus of her dissertation is parenting among adolescent African-American and Latina mothers.

Kathryn Van Eck, PhD

Dr. Van Eck is a clinical psychologist and a JHU LEAH Fellow in Psychology. Her research interests focus on reducing disparities in access and use of health and mental health care services through several approaches. She is interested in identify individual and environmental predictors of risk behavior and negative outcomes for youth with disruptive behavior. She is also interested in identifying ways to support adolescents and their families in increasing engagement in health and mental health care as well as exploring ways to link health care services to the school context to improve access to services. Dr. Van Eck began her studies by earning a Master of Science in Psychological Sciences from James Madison University. She received her doctorate in Clinical-Community Psychology from the University of South Carolina and completed her pre-doctoral clinical internship at the VA Maryland Health Care System/University of Maryland Baltimore Psychology Consortium, School Mental Health track. During her internship, she worked at the Center for School Mental Health as a school-based clinician and contributed to the dissemination of research on school mental health for practice and policy purposes. She is pursuing an academic career focused on developmental and clinical research to reduce engagement in risk behavior and to improve access to health and mental health services for adolescents and their families.

Leslie Redmond, MS RD

Leslie Redmond is a nutrition PhD student at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and is the nutrition fellow for the JHU LEAH program. Leslie completed her undergraduate degree in Food Science at Clemson University, after which she spent nine months in Alaska completing her dietetic internship. Her experience in Alaska lead to her current research interest in the prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes in American Indian and Alaska Native populations, with an emphasis on adolescents. After earning her registered dietitian credentials, Leslie earned a master’s degree in exercise science at James Madison University, where she continued to work in health promotion for adolescents while working as a camp counselor at a weight loss camp for teens and volunteering on research projects at the Morrison Bruce Center for the Promotion of Physical Activity for Girls and Women. At Johns Hopkins, Leslie’s thesis research involves the evaluation of multi-level, multi-institutional obesity prevention programs in American Indian communities. She is a Johnson & Johnson Scholar, assisting in monitoring and evaluation capacity building for a community health organization focusing on obesity prevention in children, and also works at the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center as needed as a nutritionist and exercise physiologist, and as the Project Coordinator for the Healthy Monday’s text message based obesity prevention trial.

Uche Onyewuchi, DO

Dr. Uche Onyewuchi is a first year adolescent medicine fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She recently completed her pediatric residency training at Baystate Medical Center, Tufts University Western campus in Massachusetts. Dr. Onyewuchi is also pursuing a Masters in Health Science degree at the department of Population, Family and Reproductive health at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. She obtained her undergraduate degree in Biology from Bucknell University and her medical degree from Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Her primary focus of medical practice and research includes provision of health care to underserved communities, programs addressing health disparities, obesity and women’s health. Furthermore, her strong interest in global health has led her to participate in medical missions in the Dominican Republic and El Salvador. She is currently exploring multiple potential areas of research that combines these interests. She is also involved the on-going educational curriculum development of My Fitness Circle. She is a member of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.

Jessica Tillman, MPH BSN RN

Jessica Tillman is a PhD student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She is a magna cum laude graduate of the Accelerated BSN program at the Medical University of South Carolina, where she was inducted into Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. Since matriculating at Johns Hopkins University, Ms. Tillman has been named a 2012-2014 Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholar and a 2013-2014 Johns Hopkins University Predoctoral Clinical Research Training Program Trainee. Prior to becoming a registered nurse, Ms. Tillman earned a BS in Exercise Science from Florida State University, and an MPH in Public Health Administration from the University of South Carolina. Her nursing experience includes medical-surgical, family medicine, and public health. She currently works as a Clinical Research Nurse at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Her primary research interest in sexually transmitted infections is supported by her current work as a research assistant for Technology Enhanced Community Health Nursing (TECH-N), a randomized controlled trial (principal investigator: Dr. Maria Trent) to improve health outcomes among young women diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease.

Deanna Wilson, MD MPH

Deanna Wilson is a second-year Adolescent Medicine fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Deanna was a Sociology and Anthropology major at Swarthmore College. Following completion of her undergraduate degree, she was a Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellow at the Congressional Hunger Center, which is a leadership development, advocacy, and service program for individuals interested in root causes of hunger and poverty. This solidified her interests in the intersection of policy, research, advocacy and clinical work and the utility of these tools in addressing health disparities. She then attended Yale University School of Medicine. She took an additional year during medical school to work on the design and implementation of a community-feeding program and public health education project for mothers and infants in rural Honduras. Following graduation, she attended the Urban Health Internal Medicine and Pediatrics residency program at Johns Hopkins. She is interested in translating substance use research into clinical practice through targeted educational interventions for physicians-in-training. She designed HOPE: Hospital-based Overdose Prevention and Education Initiative to address the epidemic of overdose deaths in Baltimore with a goal of teaching medicine house staff to screen patients for overdose risk and prescribe naloxone. She is interested in the design and evaluation of innovative models of care targeting marginalized and disenfranchised youth. She received the 2014 NIDA-SAHM Clinician Scientist Award in Substance Use and Misuse for a study evaluating relationships between mindfulness, emotion regulation, and substance use in adolescents and young adult opioid users at time of presentation to treatment and is interested in ultimately incorporating mindfulness-based techniques into both primary care and substance use treatment. She is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and board eligible by the American Board of Pediatrics.